Text Size:
Updated On: Thursday, 21 June 2018
Development Issues
Closing Africa’s Wealth Gap ( Wednesday, 20 June 2018 12:05 )
Universities & Their Duty to Help Refugees ( Wednesday, 13 June 2018 14:48 )
Warnings of a New Global Financial Crisis ( Monday, 11 June 2018 12:12 )

Speakers Support Streamlined Processes, Decentralized Authority as Fifth Committee Considers Proposal to Reorganize Management Structures at Headquarters

Content by: UN General Assembly

Delegates in the Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary) today advocated streamlining processes and reducing unnecessary bureaucracy to best equip the United Nations to deliver on its mandates as the Secretary‑General’s Chef de Cabinet laid out his proposal to decentralize the management structures at Headquarters.

Introducing his report titled, “Shifting the management paradigm in the United Nations:  implementing a new management architecture for improved effectiveness and strengthened accountability”, Maria Luiza Ribeiro Viotti said the aim was to move from a bureaucracy focused on process to an institution focused on results.  “Management reform is about more than restructuring,” she said, stressing:  “At its core, it’s about making sure that the Secretariat is better positioned and equipped to fulfil its duties.”

The overhaul would involve segregating policy from operations to allow the Secretariat to constantly assess and improve the effectiveness of policies and administrative support functions.  Moving to an integrated supply chain management approach would ensure that missions and field offices received goods and services at the right time.  In procurement and human resource management, where current structures were particularly slow and cumbersome, better policies and more support for managers was needed.  “Our policies have been too Headquarters‑centric, with staff contracts and conditions of service failing to reflect the imperatives of the field,” she said.

The Secretary‑General proposed the creation of several new features and management functions from within existing resources, including a new Uniformed Capabilities Support Division that would comprise a “one‑stop shop” for troop- and police‑contributing countries for administrative and logistical issues.  A new Support Partnerships Service would focus on situations where the Organization provided support to non‑United Nations entities.

Some departments would be integrated, she said, adding that health‑care management and occupational health and safety, currently split across three departments, would be consolidated into a single division.  Administrative law, and conduct and discipline functions would be brought together.  The Secretary‑General was seeking the General Assembly’s support for the creation of two new departments and the resources required, she said, a process that would require a great deal of change in the subsequent six months.  Close to 70 posts for the new departments would need to be reprofiled, advertised and filled.

Carlos Ruiz Massieu, Chairman of the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions, introduced the corresponding report and said that the Advisory Committee largely recommended approving the concept and design of the new proposed structures and having the Secretary‑General consider reviewing the proposed placement of the Procurement Division together with the Logistics Divisions under the new Office of Supply Chain Management in the Department of Operational Support.  There was a need to maintain strict segregation of duties between the requisitioning and procuring entities, as well as between the entities responsible for the conduct of technical and commercial evaluation.

The Advisory Committee also recommended that the Secretary‑General be asked to consider consolidating under a single administrative structure the proposed Office of Human Resources in the Department of Management Strategy, Policy and Compliance and the proposed Human Resources Services Division in the Office of Support Operations of the Department of Operational Support.  Doing so would ensure a unified approach, allow optimization of the distribution of functions and avoid duplication.

In the ensuing discussion, Member States used their own national experiences to advocate a more responsive, responsible and credible United Nations, requested clarification on proposals and stressed the need to ensure equitable geographical representation and gender parity at all levels within the Organization.

The representative of Timor‑Leste agreed with the report, saying that to enable the United Nations to effectively discharge its mandate, authority must be delegated to the field to perform vital functions like hiring staff and deciding how to use budgetary and administrative resources.  He cited as an example the second United Nations mission in East Timor, as it was then known, which was slow to deploy, despite the desperate need to revive the core State functions of public finance, justice and policing.

Pakistan’s representative said complicated United Nations procedures, duplicating authorities, fragmented approaches and inefficient rules must change.  Of the $1.2 billion owed to troop- and police‑contributing countries, $70 million was owed to Pakistan, she added, welcoming the Secretary‑General’s commitment to operationalize a new Uniformed Capabilities Support Division to expedite reimbursement to Member States.

Echoing that sentiment, Canada’s representative, also speaking on behalf of Australia and New Zealand, said practical changes, such as the proposed one‑stop shop for troop‑contributing countries, would make the United Nations more effective.

Singapore’s delegate, speaking on behalf of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), emphasizing that such reforms were long overdue, called for concrete efforts and measurable progress in ensuring equitable geographical distribution across the United Nations, including at senior levels.  The representative of Angola, on behalf of the African Group, added:  “The African Group anticipates a human resource fabric that does not accommodate the discriminatory exclusion of certain Member States or regions.”

The representative of the United States said that the Secretary‑General had made a compelling case for change.  “The message is clear:  the status quo is not an option” and the time to act was now, she said, underscoring the importance of seizing on the momentum gained over the last few months to ensure implementation by January 2019.

Egypt’s representative, also speaking on behalf of the “Group of 77” developing countries and China, said it was unrealistic to call for the United Nations to function effectively, fully implement its mandates and undertake major change without providing it with the needed financial resources.  “If we expect the Secretary‑General to implement reform, we must give him the tools to do so,” he stressed.

Also today, the Fifth Committee considered a draft resolution titled “Financing of the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon”, postponing action on the text.

Also speaking today were the representatives of Israel, Switzerland (also on behalf of Liechtenstein), Mexico, Brazil, Morocco, China, Cuba, Russian Federation, Norway, Japan and Kenya as well as the European Union.

The Fifth Committee will meet again at a date and time to be announced.

United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL)

MOHAMED FOUAD AHMED (Egypt), speaking on behalf of the “Group of 77” developing countries and China, referenced the Secretary‑General’s report stating that Israel had not paid the amount of $1,117,005 due as accounts receivable for the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL).  He also underscored that the Secretary‑General had received no response to his subsequent letters addressed to the Permanent Mission of Israel — the last one dated 16 January 2018.  The Group stressed that the amount due from the incident in Qana on 18 April 1996 must be paid by Israel.  The Group requested the Secretary‑General to report on the matter to the General Assembly at its next session.  The Group also sponsored preambular paragraph 4 and operative paragraphs 4, 5 and 13 of draft resolution A/C.5/72/L.31, and of the draft resolution as a whole, entitled “Financing of the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon”.

YARON WAX (Israel) said the annual ritual on the item politicized the work of the Fifth Committee.  The Group of 77 chose to hijack discussions in pursuit of claims against a single Member State.  The Committee had been unable to reach consensus on the item, due to the fact that there had been no attempt to even raise those issues during informal consultations, prior to today’s meeting.  While reiterating support for the work of UNIFIL, he noted that the inappropriate use of the Fifth Committee platform had become a ritual over time.

The Committee then postponed action on the text.

Review of Efficiency:  Shifting the Management Paradigm in the United Nations

MARIA LUIZA RIBEIRO VIOTTI, Chef de Cabinet, introduced the Secretary‑General’s report titled, “Shifting the management paradigm in the United Nations:  implementing a new management architecture for improved effectiveness and strengthened accountability” (document A/72/492/Add.2) and highlighted that the Secretary‑General had launched three reform tracks in 2017.  Those reform efforts were aimed at the peace and security architecture, the development system and the internal management of the United Nations.  All sought to improve the Secretariat’s ability to implement its mandates and use its resources more effectively.  “Management reform is about more than restructuring,” she said, stressing:  “At its core, it’s about making sure that the Secretariat is better positioned and equipped to fulfil its duties.”  Management reform was about greater transparency, accountability and effectiveness and changing the status quo, she added.

To reach those objectives, a shift in the Organization’s management paradigm was required — moving from a centralized to a decentralized Secretariat, and from a bureaucracy focused on process to an institution focused on results, she said.  The Secretary‑General strongly believed that segregating policy from operations in the Organization’s management structures was a prerequisite for meaningful change.  The proposed restructuring would enable that segregation and would allow the Secretariat to constantly assess and improve the effectiveness of policies and administrative support functions.  Procurement and human resource management were two areas where the current structures were particularly slow and cumbersome.  Moving to an integrated supply chain management approach would ensure that missions and field offices received goods and services at the right place, the right time and at the right cost.

On human resources management, there needed to be better policies and more support for managers, she said, emphasizing:  “Our policies have been too Headquarters‑centric, with staff contracts and conditions of service failing to reflect the imperatives of the field.”  The proposed structure took full account of segregation of duties between policy framers and implementers and it would allow for more effective compliance.  The proposed reorganization of structures was not only a response to current weaknesses, but was also about building on the benefits derived from past reforms.

The Secretary‑General proposed the creation of several new features and management functions from within existing resources, including the formation of a new Business Transformation and Accountability Division focused on performance, monitoring, self‑evaluation and compliance functions.  A new Uniformed Capabilities Support Division would create a one‑stop shop for troop- and police‑contributing countries for administrative and logistical issues, while a new Support Partnerships Service would focus on situations where the Organization provided support to non-United Nations entities, particularly African peace support operations.  Health‑care management and occupational health and safety, currently split across three departments, would be consolidated into a single division, while administrative law, and conduct and discipline functions would be brought together.  Further, the global information technology functions would be consolidated into one office, while a new Management Client Board would also be created.

The Secretary‑General was seeking the General Assembly’s support for the creation of two new departments and the resources required, she said, a process that would require a great deal of change in the subsequent six months.  Close to 70 posts for the new departments would need to be reprofiled, advertised and filled, she said, adding:  “We need to find a humane solution for the staff who will be affected” which would entail determining if those staff members could be retrained, moved laterally or would prefer to take a buy‑out package.  It was essential that United Nations staff members understood the changes to their own roles and responsibilities under the new paradigm and to that end, guidance and training would be undertaken in the coming months.

CARLOS RUIZ MASSIEU, Chairman of the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions, introduced the corresponding report (document A/72/7/Add.49) and said that the Advisory Committee largely recommended approval of the concept and design of the new structures proposed by the Secretary‑General.  The Advisory Committee recognized that the proposals were driven by the need for improved effectiveness in the delivery of mandates and the achievement of results.  The Advisory Committee recommended that the General Assembly ask the Secretary‑General to consider reviewing the proposed placement of the Procurement Division together with the Logistics Divisions under the new Office of Supply Chain Management in the Department of Operational Support.  The Advisory Committee believed there was a need to maintain strict segregation of duties between the requisitioning and procuring entities, as well as between the entities responsible for the conduct of technical and commercial evaluation.

The Advisory Committee also recommended that the General Assembly request the Secretary‑General to consider consolidating under a single administrative structure the proposed Office of Human Resources in the Department of Management Strategy, Policy and Compliance and the proposed Human Resources Services Division in the Office of Support Operations of the Department of Operational Support.  Doing so would ensure a unified approach, allow optimization of the distribution of functions and avoid duplication.  A major endeavour such as the reorganization of Headquarters management structures should provide opportunities to seek ways to eliminate duplication and overlap and achieve more efficient structures.

The Advisory Committee welcomed the Secretary‑General’s focus on achieving a strong culture of accountability throughout the Secretariat and stressed that the exemplary leadership of senior management was critical in setting the tone and standards for a strong culture of responsibility, accountability and personal integrity.  On delegation of authority and accountability issues, the Committee was of the view that the General Assembly should be provided with further details, including on progress made towards establishing well‑defined roles and responsibilities.

Statements

Mr. FOUAD (Egypt), speaking on behalf of the Group of 77 and China, said that the management functions of the Secretariat were the backbone of the entire United Nations system.  Implemented correctly, management reform should underpin other reform processes including the repositioning of the Organization’s development system.  Last year’s General Assembly adoption of resolution 72/266 began that process, as it approved the Secretary‑General’s proposal to move the United Nations from a biennial to an annual budget.  “Full respect for the intergovernmental nature of negotiations and for the General Assembly procedure remains the cornerstone of this process,” he added, stressing the need for increased transparency and accountability.  The United Nations must cut cumbersome bureaucratic procedures within the Secretariat, he also emphasized.  The goal of reform was not to cut costs or posts, but to enable the Organization to better deliver on its mandates.

He welcomed the Secretary‑General’s proposal to create a new Uniformed Capabilities Support Division, a single point of contact for troop- and police‑contributing countries on all administrative and logistical issues.  It was unrealistic to call for the United Nations to function effectively, fully implement its mandates and undertake major change without providing it with the needed financial resources.  “If we expect the Secretary‑General to implement reform, we must give him the tools to do so,” he added.  Reform must be undertaken to create a more responsive, but also more responsible and credible Organization.  As reforms directly impacted the financial and administrative management of the United Nations, the Group would examine the proposals to assess how those changes could improve the delivery of outcomes.  He recalled that Headquarters had mandates to Member States, including servicing legislative and judicial functions.  He also stressed the need to ensure equitable geographical representation and gender parity at all levels, calling for increased access to United Nations procurement opportunities for developing countries.

MARCIO BURITY (Angola), speaking on behalf of the African Group and associating himself with the Group of 77 and China, welcomed the reform’s aim of streamlining procedures and enhancing accountability, transparency and oversight.  The United Nations must be results‑oriented, he added, taking note of a number of changes in the report and requesting clarification on areas of interest, including on the restructuring of human resource management.  He said that the Group would seek a better understanding of the enhancement of departments of the United Nations, including the Office of the Special Adviser on Africa and the United Nations Office of the High Representative for the Least Developed Countries, Landlocked Developing Countries, and Small Island Developing States.

He highlighted the need for an effective human resource management system, emphasizing the need for geographical representation and gender inclusivity.  “The African Group anticipates a human resource fabric that does not accommodate the discriminatory exclusion of certain Member States or regions,” he said.  As part of the reform initiative, the Group requested information on how the proposal would impact offices away from Headquarters.  He took note that management reform would be implemented in a cost‑neutral manner and would therefore require the rearrangement and redeployment of resources.  No initiative should be implemented without the consideration and approval of intergovernmental bodies, he added, reaffirming the role of the Fifth Committee and the Committee for Programme and Coordination.

MICHAEL GRANT (Canada), also speaking on behalf of Australia and New Zealand, said that Secretary‑General António Guterres was appointed on a strong reform platform.  “As the Chief Administrative Officer of the United Nations, we should trust and support him to improve and modernize the Organization by approving his proposal in full,” he said.  Practical changes, such as the proposed one‑stop shop for troop‑contributing countries, would make the United Nations more effective.  With the General Assembly set to adopt the United Nations development system reform outcome today, the Fifth Committee should contribute to its success by supporting management reform.  He said that structural changes must be supported by cultural changes, including in leadership and accountability.  The United Nations must incentivize collaboration and think differently about how to solve problems.  “We must seize this once‑in‑a‑generation opportunity to realize concrete organizational reform, that will have real benefits for the United Nations operations in the field and for the people they serve,” he added.

DIANA LEE (Singapore), speaking on behalf of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) and aligning herself with the Group of 77 and China, thanked the Advisory Committee for its through consideration of the issues, also adding that she would have liked to see reports on accountability, information and communications technology and the Global Service Delivery Model.  She reiterated that reform must continue to be focused on outcomes, especially in the quality of services rendered to Member States.

Welcoming the Secretary‑General’s emphasis on streamlining processes and reducing unnecessary bureaucracy, she said that such reforms were long overdue.  ASEAN would pay particular attention to the role of oversight bodies in the proposed new structures.  Praising the Secretary‑General’s intention to promote a culture change in the Organization, she welcomed the fact that his report touched on significant evaluations for managers and leaders.  She called for concrete efforts and measurable progress in ensuring equitable geographical distribution across the United Nations, including at senior levels.

JOANNE ADAMSON, European Union, said that the bloc supported the Secretary‑General’s proposals for the restructuring of the current Department of Management and the Department of Field Support within the Secretariat.  Emphasizing that the United Nations management processes had grown too complex to be able to respond to today’s challenges in a flexible and agile manner, she said that it was time for the Organization to evolve and become fit for purpose.  The separation of policy and strategy from operational support functions had the potential to allow staff to focus on their core responsibilities and bring more effectiveness and efficiency to Secretariat activities.  The European Union would carefully study the observations and recommendations made by the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions and would seek assurances regarding its remaining questions and concerns.

JÜRG LAUBER (Switzerland), also speaking on behalf of Liechtenstein, expressed full support for the Secretary‑General’s vision for management reform and his proposal to shift the Organization’s management paradigm.  “At the centre of the reform must be a cultural shift within the United Nations,” he said, stressing that the Organization must move to a culture that was driven by results rather than processes.  The everyday work of United Nations staff members must focus on clear objectives and be guided by simplified, common sense policies and processes.  At the same time, staff and managers must be held accountable for their actions and performance through an effective accountability system and an efficient, results‑based management framework.  That transformation must also include a comprehensive reform of the Organization’s human resources management.

CHERITH NORMAN CHALET (United States) said that the Secretary‑General had made a compelling case for change and had already set the Organization on a path to success in addressing existing challenges.  “The message is clear:  the status quo is not an option” and the time to act was now, she said, underscoring the importance of seizing on the momentum gained over the last few months to ensure implementation by January 2019.  Efficiency was essential to reform, as each Member State had a duty to its taxpayers to ensure that the Organization’s resources were being used wisely.  The reform was not about restructuring — it represented a shift in the management paradigm, one that was characterized by decentralization, elimination of duplicative functions and proper oversight.  True reform would only take place with an accompanying transformation in organizational culture; one that rewarded and incentivized performance and innovation and appropriately addressed underperformance.

JESÚS VELÁZQUEZ CASTILLO (Mexico) said it was very important to discuss in detail the Secretary‑General’s second report on management to make the United Nations more effective, efficient and modern.  Mexico believed that the content of the proposal was positive and its implementation should not include requests for further financing.   Mexico would consider in detail the proposals and would seek further clarification on the reform’s impact on human resources and information and communications technology.  He asked how and according to what timetable would Member States be able to examine and evaluate progress and make relevant adjustments.  “We have an opportunity to move forward in the reform process to have a United Nations that is more effective,” he said, pledging Mexico’s full cooperation.

FREDERICO SALOMÃO DUQUE ESTRADA MEYER (Brazil), associating himself with the Group of 77 and China, said that his country had long defended the belief that reform was critical to ensuring the quality of the mandates the Organization was tasked with.  That required updating the composition of the Security Council, as the current configuration did not represent the realities of the contemporary world.  He expressed support for the proposal to take forward the management paradigm shift by decentralizing the Secretariat.  The pivot to a field‑centric Secretariat encompassed both delegation of authority over human and financial resources and the restructuring of departments at Headquarters.  He said that simplified bureaucracy and procedures for the Secretariat should not be mistaken for failure to abide by the Charter‑based oversight system of budgetary and administrative affairs.  Management reform could not be complete without concrete measures for equitable geographical representation and gender parity throughout the Secretariat.

OMAR HILALE (Morocco), associating himself with the Group of 77 and the African Group, expressed his delegation’s support for the Secretary‑General’s reform vision.  The Secretary‑General was determined to make the Organization better performing, effective and capable of adapting to current challenges.  He stressed the importance of an effective, responsible and better‑tooled Secretariat, which more efficiently used all its financial and human resources.  On management issues, the exemplary leadership of senior officials was required for a robust culture of accountability and to ensure respect for the relevant rules and regulations.  He drew attention to the need to review the way in which United Nations staff members were recruited.  On the issue of delegation of authority, guarantees of implementation must be clearly stipulated to ensure that the system was properly used and that resources were properly managed.

MALEEHA LODHI (Pakistan) said complicated United Nations procedures, duplicating authorities, fragmented approaches and inefficient rules must change.  She advocated a system that guaranteed transparency and accountability for the Secretary‑General and Member States alike, stressing that the Assembly’s role must be strengthened in evaluating managerial performance.  Of the $1.2 billion owed to troop- and police‑contributing countries, $70 million was owed to Pakistan, and she welcomed the Secretary‑General’s commitment to operationalize a new Uniformed Capabilities Support Division to expedite reimbursement to Member States.  Reiterating the demand to adhere to equitable geographic representation in peacekeeping, she said gender mainstreaming, especially female staff from developing countries, should be a priority, as must adequate funding for achieving desired results on the ground.

FU DAOPENG (China) expressed support for management reform, which it expected would enhance the United Nations operational capacity and efficiency, and accommodate the interests of all parties.  The Organization’s management culture should be characterized by diversity, inclusiveness and efficiency, with management reform redressing the imbalance in geographic representation.  It also should be conducive to achieving results‑oriented management goals.  The reform of management bodies should seek to achieve scientific and efficient management, aimed at resolving problems in the work of the Secretariat and building an effective management architecture.  He looked forward to receiving more information from the Secretariat on the Advisory Committee’s recommendations on the Secretary‑General’s proposals for procurement and human resources management, adding that accountability and internal risk control must be strengthened.

ANA SILVIA RODRÍGUEZ ABASCAL (Cuba), associating herself with the Group of 77 and China, welcomed the inclusive, transparent and open reform process established by the Secretary‑General.  It was evident that reform was necessary, although the Fifth Committee must not set aside other issues of vital importance, such as the adoption of peacekeeping budgets and related items, while addressing the reform issue.  She underscored that her delegation believed that the commitment to reform must move beyond words into actions, and in that context, she stressed the need for all Member States to pay their assessed contributions in a timely fashion.  Simplifying procedures and ensuring commensurate decentralization of decision‑making processes must go hand in hand with the strengthening of planning tools and systems of accountability.  She emphasized that it was important to make senior managers accountable for poor performance to ensure a genuine culture of transparency and accountability.  The Committee must work carefully on the reform issue, which was a turning point during which much of the future of the Organization would be determined.

MARIA V. FROLOVA (Russian Federation) said it was crucial to foster constructive dialogue between Member States and the Secretariat to reach common ground on reforming the United Nations.  Member States must maintain “real leverage” over United Nations human and financial resources.  The Secretary‑General’s proposed structural reforms must strengthen accountability systems at all managerial levels at Headquarters and in the field.  It was essential to avoid duplication of work and dilution of resources.  She called on the Secretariat to provide more information on the financial implications of proposals on the biennial budget and peacekeeping operations for 2018‑2019.  She also took note of the Advisory Committee’s reservations about the reform of the procurement and human resources structures, as well as the issues of accountability for information and communications technology.  It would be useful for the Secretariat to prepare further information on the nexus between that reform and ongoing reforms, in particular the deployment of Umoja, the Organization’s enterprise resource planning project, among others.

LILL-ANN BJAARSTAD MEDINA (Norway) said management reforms were critical for the Organization, with simplified procedures and decentralized decisions amplifying the ability to deliver on agreed mandates and results in country settings and to have more impact in peace, security, development and human rights protections.  The restructuring proposal was a starting point for change and could be a baseline to measure progress.  While reforms should not be a means to reduce the United Nations budget, eliminating time‑consuming processes and obsolete procedures were aimed at improving cost‑effectiveness and efficiency, which in turn would release resources that could and should be used to deliver better on mandates.  It was due time to enable the Secretary‑General to reshape the Organization, putting him in a position, together with his leaders and staff, to make real changes in working methods and culture.

KATSUHIKO IMADA (Japan), reiterating support for the Secretary‑General’s reform initiative, said accountability and transparency should be enhanced in the streamlined work of the Secretariat and mainstreamed as a central principle in the Organization’s culture.  The Secretariat could consider making programme performance information available to the public and Member States through dashboards, he said, underscoring the integral nature of the Global Service Delivery Model in the Secretary‑General’s management reform vision and expressing Japan’s readiness to discuss the new proposal for the Model so it could be launched as proposed in January.

DANILO XIMENES GONCLAVES (Timor-Leste) advocated support for the Secretary‑General in operationalizing the proposed reforms, underscoring that management reforms underpinned those for the peace and security architecture.  To enable the United Nations to effectively discharge its mandate, authority must be delegated to the field.  He cited as an example the second United Nations mission in East Timor, as it was then known, which was slow to deploy, despite the desperate need to revive the core State functions of public finance, justice and policing.  The Secretary‑General’s Special Representative at the time had been frustrated by his lack of power to hire staff, and further, limited control over the budget and the Mission’s administrative functions.  He thus supported the delegation of power to the field in determining how best to use resources to support programme delivery and mandate implementation.

ROBERT NGEI MULE (Kenya), associating himself with the Group of 77 and the African Group, said that his delegation believed the proposed reforms would achieve their intended objectives, and in that connection, he underlined the need to ensure organizational readiness so that staff were willing to adapt to the anticipated changes.  The envisaged review of the current policy and regulatory framework and procedures was indispensable for ensuring effective mandate implementation and to assist the General Assembly in undertaking its oversight role.  The proposed merger of the Department of Management and the Department of Field Support would streamline implementation of decisions, he said, adding that his delegation believed that streamlining chain management processes and procedures could realize greater value for money.

GET CONNECTED WITH US

Subscribe to our newsletter